Browsing articles in "Uncategorized"
Oct 11, 2011
Comments Off on Seth Godin in “We Are All Weird” When we remove this moral myth of compliance, how does it change our understanding of authority? If it is not moral to comply, why comply? Without compliance, what are we left with? So many great things in Seth Godin’s book.

Seth Godin in “We Are All Weird” When we remove this moral myth of compliance, how does it change our understanding of authority? If it is not moral to comply, why comply? Without compliance, what are we left with? So many great things in Seth Godin’s book.

We believe it is moral to comply.

Oct 11, 2011
Comments Off on Seth Godin in “We Are All Weird” How does this change the role of the study of English Literature? It is no longer in the curriculum as such, but there is the “unwritten” curriculum that English classes need to “study a novel”. How does the re-mix culture change this?

Seth Godin in “We Are All Weird” How does this change the role of the study of English Literature? It is no longer in the curriculum as such, but there is the “unwritten” curriculum that English classes need to “study a novel”. How does the re-mix culture change this?

Anil Dash points out that there is no longer a canon — no longer a corpus of work that a culturally intelligent person could be counted on to have experienced. It’s possible to hve never seen Star Wars or attentively listened to Beethoven being played live. … Making it worse, the endless varieties, remixes, and spin-offs mean that even if you have experienced one version of part of the canon, There’s another better faster different version that only obsessives have interacted with.

Sep 9, 2011
Comments Off on Christopher Reeves Whether you are feeling the pain of an unstable situation, the pain of having to change, or the pain of a long-distance run, it will go away.

Christopher Reeves Whether you are feeling the pain of an unstable situation, the pain of having to change, or the pain of a long-distance run, it will go away.

Pain is inevitable. Misery is a choice.

Sep 1, 2011
Comments Off on Daniela Papi on CBC Radio’s Q with Jion Gomeshi I heard this intriguing interview with Daniela Papi the other night on CBC Radio. She challenged the idea of living in service of others and challenged how we help others, especially in developing countries. To listen: http://www.cbc.ca/q/episodes/ — August 30th, 2011 At the same time, I have been doing rigorous research to find an organization I want to support with my time and money that exhibits the qualities of global development, social justice and sustainability that I want to exhibit. An organization that is connected to open access to education, literacy or something of that ilk. It has been a challenge. I haven’t arrived onto one organization that has connected to me. And so, I’m asking for some help. Please let me know if you are aware of an organization that is doing good, meaningful and thoughtful work. Thanks!

Daniela Papi on CBC Radio’s Q with Jion Gomeshi I heard this intriguing interview with Daniela Papi the other night on CBC Radio. She challenged the idea of living in service of others and challenged how we help others, especially in developing countries. To listen: http://www.cbc.ca/q/episodes/ — August 30th, 2011 At the same time, I have been doing rigorous research to find an organization I want to support with my time and money that exhibits the qualities of global development, social justice and sustainability that I want to exhibit. An organization that is connected to open access to education, literacy or something of that ilk. It has been a challenge. I haven’t arrived onto one organization that has connected to me. And so, I’m asking for some help. Please let me know if you are aware of an organization that is doing good, meaningful and thoughtful work. Thanks!

We invest in things, because it is easy for us to build things and it is easy to see that it happens. You don’t necessarily know that 342 teachers were trained with the same donation, or a smaller one.

Aug 23, 2011
Comments Off on Letter to My Dad

Letter to My Dad

Sometimes the best life lessons aren’t lessons at all, they are just life.

What follows is a letter I wrote my Dad a few days after his death. I read it at his funeral service.

Dad,

When I was growing up, I never listened to you. When you spoke, you spoke with authority, whether you had it or not. What could you possibly know about living in my world? It must be generational, I’d tell myself. You worked a job where you wore a shirt and tie everyday. You listened to twangy country music and scoffed anytime I wanted to spend money on anything cool. You were pragmatic and measured; all the things that made me roll my eyes when I was younger.

As years went by, things changed. Those cheesy little phrases you always said had started to mean something different. You used to always say, “Pitter patter, let’s get at ‘er.” Now I know that you were teaching me to take advantage of the day, of the immediate. There is no sense in waiting for the opportunity to come. It is my job to go make it.

You’d say, “Just skate it off,” no matter the injury. I used to think you were just being hard on me. But now I can see, you wanted me to recognize that the battle is never over on the first strike. It is up to me to get back up and carry on.

Anytime any of us were going out you’d remind us that, “I know a lot of people in this city.” At the time I thought it was a threat to us kids that you knew our every move, but I’ve come to learn that it is a statement about living with honour and integrity; about having respect for your self and for each other. It was a reminder to build community and to make connections.

When things got heated and contentious, you’d always say, “It’s not an argument, it’s a discussion.” Then, I thought it was you trying to poke the fire. But now, I see you wanted me to recognize the value of having a difference of opinion without judging a person’s character. You wanted us to accept all viewpoints, to embrace a good discussion, and to be open to learn from those in opposition.

You answered the phone, like no one else, with your particular, “And, how are you now?” You didn’t want a cookie cutter greeting; this was you having an authentic desire to know people. You aspired to form genuine connections with people; you were interested in them, in the immediate.

Each time we drove by a farmer’s field with freshly laid manure, you’d always look to Mom and say, “Whoa dear, I love your new perfume.” We always laughed and thought it was you just having fun, but you were showing us how to build and maintain a relationship with our spouse that was genuine and fun. You were teaching us to revel in love.

After every road trip, after sitting in the car, all 6 of us, you’d always end it off with, “Home again, gone again, Finnegan.” I never knew what it really meant, and frankly, I’m still trying to figure it out. But I’m sure it holds a lesson that I’ll finally learn to appreciate.

Thank you for being a great teacher, for laying the groundwork so that all four of us can see the world in all its glory. Today I celebrate the life you lived, the life you loved and the life I got to share with you.

Love,
Scott

Aug 22, 2011
Comments Off on Sign at the front of my classroom. You will impact the day today. That’s a foregone conclusion. The only question left is, how?

Sign at the front of my classroom. You will impact the day today. That’s a foregone conclusion. The only question left is, how?

How did you impact the world today?

Aug 4, 2011
Comments Off on Everything. When was the last time you changed your mind on a strongly held belief? I mean, total flip flop? Don’t you think it’s time? Too often we form our belief and then ride it until death.  Today, just might be the day to re-think.

Everything. When was the last time you changed your mind on a strongly held belief? I mean, total flip flop? Don’t you think it’s time? Too often we form our belief and then ride it until death.  Today, just might be the day to re-think.

Maybe it is time to reconsider.

Aug 1, 2011
Comments Off on Too often, we fill in the rest of the story, the rest of the person. We establish the motives and the reason why people do the things they do. Maybe, just maybe, if we waited for the story to be told we’d walk away with a greater appreciation for the nuance of character, setting, themes. I’m sitting in a hospital and the stories of people are written on their faces, puffy red eyes, looks of hope, desparation. Who am I to fill in the details?

Too often, we fill in the rest of the story, the rest of the person. We establish the motives and the reason why people do the things they do. Maybe, just maybe, if we waited for the story to be told we’d walk away with a greater appreciation for the nuance of character, setting, themes. I’m sitting in a hospital and the stories of people are written on their faces, puffy red eyes, looks of hope, desparation. Who am I to fill in the details?

Go ahead, make me into someone for you to tell stories about.

Apr 27, 2011
Comments Off on Scott Kemp

Scott Kemp

I much prefer the student that will tell you to ‘fuck off’ to your face then the one who lies through their smile.

Mar 24, 2011

Twenty First Century Learning in 21 Words

A great blog I read, Teach Paperless, issued a challenge today to, “You have been put in charge of creating a brand new education system. … This being the 21st century, you have to explain your entire concept in 21 words or less.”

Here is my response:

“Learning – up front and essential. No marks, just feedback. Encouraged inquiry and problem solving. Create something original and meaningful. Be great!”

Join in by comment here or at http://ht.ly/4lBNw.

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